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Thermaltake Golden Org (Model 370)





Author: Fido
Posted on: 7/31/2000
Sponsor: Thermaltake
Discuss: In the forums




BackGround
When Thermaltake released their Golden Orb line back in February of this year, the public was initially stunned by its radical design. Six months, and 50 reviews later, we have accepted the Orb into our lives.

Hence when I installed my Golden Orb in my machine this past weekend, my initial thoughts were 'why do a review on something that someone else has already covered countless times...'. But as time went on, tests were run, and I read all the articles about how people were trashing their Durons by installing Golden Orbs on them, I figured its time to write and make some phone calls. The question I had was 'What is Thermaltake going to do about the situation?' - Well we have answers. But first, some background information (pay special attention to the third one):
"A friend of mine had just bought a 850 MHz Thunderbird and a Golden Orb cooler. He mounted the cooler but in the process he heard a crunching sound and the computer would not start at all. He took the CPU out of the system and discovered that a part of the core had come off. This is not the first incident I have heard of regarding T-Birds or Durons that have been damaged when mounting a cooler and especially a Golden Orb. There are other examples of how to destroy a CPU (just ask Kyle from HardOCP) and therefore I feel that it is time to issue an alert on which cooler you mount on a AMD socket A CPU." - GamersOnline

"I take the heatsink off. I clean up the crunchy stuff (what was a corner of the die) and now it doesn't boot! I was VERY Careful when putting the HSF on. My theory is that there is a lack of sealant around the die and it didn't support the core properly. When you look at a Celeron2 I have with lots of edges missing, there is plenty of sealant around it, and it still works!" - InsaneHardware

"A few people, namely Jai from Insane Hardware and Joe from Tech Junkie have recently killed their new Socket A Duron's by installing various different HSF (Heatsink Fans) on them. The force of the clipping mechanism and the lack of sealant around the Duron's core causes the Duron's core area to literally break down and crack thus becoming useless." - TweakTown
Lesson Leaned: Never install a Golden Orb (Model 370) on a Socket 462 (Socket A) Chip!

Alrighty Then! With that said, I made a phone call to Thermaltake today to find out the answer to the question that sparked this review in the first place. Here is what I found (A few of these items have already been covered elsewhere, but I want to list them all for good reason.)
  • Thermaltake will radically change the part numbers on the two confusable products (Socket 370 / Socket 462)
  • Thermaltake will change the packaging on most / all of its products so that they are more descriptive
  • Stickers will be placed on products which must be removed prior to installation. These stickers will clearly state which socket type this model is designed for
  • Socket 462 Models will be drastically changed to the color GREEN! Yes, no more GOLDEN ORB for Socket 462 owners! They will now be known as the GREEN ORBS!
If you are still confused, below you find a couple pictures of the two different models in question. Notice that one has a wider clip. That's an easy giveaway for ya.



With that said I must applaud Thermatake for their actions. They realized that things could be confusing to people, and that expensive errors could occur because of this. They took the issue to heart and are correcting the problem. Thank You Thermaltake!



[Ed. Note: I received the above picture from Kyle at [H]ARDOCP. It was taken somewhere over in Tiawan. From the picture alone, I cannot verify that these are in fact Thermaltake products, but it does at least give us a preview of what to expect (thanks Kyle!)]

Now that we got all that out of the way, lets get started. As I said in the beginning, I wasn't going to do a review on this product. There are so many other reviews out there, but I was so impressed by the way this baby cooled my chip, its the least I could do.

Specifications
Part:
  INTEL FC-PGA370 COPPERMINE CPU 600MHZ- 1GHZ
  Model# TFCFR02-1

Clip:
  TCS01 Exclusive Patented Clip (twist clip)

Fan:
  Three pin power fan connector (w/ RPM sensor)
  Rated Speed: 4500RPM
  Air Volume: 20CFM
  Noise Level: 26dBA

Fins:
  60 Fins Around the Aircooler Surface
  Cylindrical cross cut design for maximum surface area exposure
  Heatsink Material AL-6063
  69dia x 43mm tall
Installation
Thermaltake has a pretty comprehensive installation guide on their website which can be found here. It works quite well for the most part, but I found myself feeling a little queazy when it came down to twisting the orb down onto my beloved processor. What I came up with is a little trick that might make it little easier for you to install the Orb. All you need is a screwdriver, which you probably already have next to you since you are cracking your case and all (unless you are like alot of people and just leaves the case cover off :-) What you do, is in the direction that you are twisting the orb, place a screwdriver next to the bracket (clip) to hold it in place. This will keep the pressure off the chip, and the socket, and allow you to twist that sucker without feeling sick. There is a picture below, which shows how this process works.



How Cool Is It
Does it really make a difference? Does it really hold your chip under its little metal blanket of coolness? Why yes indeed it sure as hell does! Prior to using the Golden Orb (Part #TFCFR02-1) on my 600E (which is overclocked to 800), I was running the Intel BOX Fan that came with the CPU when I bought it. Now keep in mind that in order for my system to run stable, I must change my core voltage from 1.65 to 1.80, which will definitely increase the heat levels for both readings. And I know I should have included some additional information here, like ambient case temperature and the like, but both readings were done at the same time and temperature, so those readings would be irrelevant here. The point I am trying to make is how much better this is compared to the norm.

Intel Box Fan Golden Orb
46 C 34 C


Does anything suck?
While their 'twist clip' mechanism has revolutionized the HSF industry, it is still pretty scary to install. A great deal of force must be applied in the initial installation, and I supposed someone that is not being cautious enough could damage something. With a little trickery, and something to brace the force against you should be just fine (see screwdriver trick above). Additionally, the power connector could be a little longer. It was fine on my BE6-II, but there are other models (of motherboards), where the power connector is much farther away.

Do I need one?
Well, in a perfect overclocking world, we would all have peltiers or something comparable. But for those of us who want to drop on extra 10 C off their stock cooling system, for less than 15 bucks, you cant beat it. In fact, they measure hard drives by a Cost / Megabyte, why not start rating cooling systems on a Cost / Degree decrease? In that case, the Golden (Green) Orb would definitely have my vote.









Copyright © by LWD All Rights Reserved.

Published on: 2004-04-10 (7947 reads)

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